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Agro-Science
Journal of Tropical Agriculture, Food, Environment and Extension
 

ISSN 1119-7455
   
 
         
 
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Article No 9 of Volume 8.2 (2009)
 
    
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IMPLICATIONS OF POLYEMBRYONY ON THE GROWTH AND YIELD OF FLUTED PUMPKIN (Telfairia occidentalis HOOK. F.)

Onovo1J. C.  Uguru2 M. I. and   Obi3  I.U.

1Department of Biological Sciences, Nasarawa State University, Keffi,

Nasarawa State, Nigeria. E-mail: onovojos@yahoo.com

2Department of Crop Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria.

3Department of Crop Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria.

 

 

ABSTRACT

Two experiments were conducted during the wet seasons of 2004 and 2005 to investigate the performance of polyembryonic lines with respect to growth and yield of fluted pumpkin. The results revealed three morphotypes of  polyembryony, namely: twin (bi-embryony), triple (tri-embryony) and quadruple (tetra-embryony). In the first year (2004), the triple and quadruple embryo types had the highest (54.52%) and lowest (2.02%) frequencies of occurrence, respectively. In the second year (2005), the frequencies of the triple and quadruple embryo types were 60.99% and 4.78%, respectively. There was no clear trend across all the embryo types investigated with respect to the characters measured. However, generally, the triple and the single (mono-embryony) lines performed better than the twin and quadruple lines. The impressive performance of the single and triple embryo types over the twin and quadruple embryo types with respect to the weight of pods, in 2004 and 2005  suggests that these embryo types are good candidates multiplication and distribution to farmers using the micropropagation technique.

 

Key words: Polyembryony, growth, yield, fluted pumpkin, Telfairia occidentalis.

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Date:16/01/2018
 
     
 
 
 
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