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Agro-Science
Journal of Tropical Agriculture, Food, Environment and Extension
 

ISSN 1119-7455
   
 
         
 
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Article No 5 of Volume 9.2 (2010)
 
    
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CHANGES IN SOIL WATER CHARACTERISTICS AND SALINITY HAZARDS IN SPENT OIL-CONTAMINATED SOIL BIOREMEDIATED WITH LEGUMES AND ORGANIC WASTE.

CHANGES IN SOIL WATER CHARACTERISTICS AND SALINITY HAZARDS IN SPENT OIL-CONTAMINATED SOIL BIOREMEDIATED WITH LEGUMES AND ORGANIC WASTE.

 

 

Udom  B.E1  and  Akamigbo F.O.R2

1Department of Crop and Soil Science, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

2Department of Soil Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

 

ABSTRACT

Three legumes (Gliricioha sepium, Leucaena leucocephala, and Calapogonium caerulean) alone and their individual combination with poultry manure were tested for their ability to improve water retention capacity and reduce salinity hazards of a sandy soil, contaminated with 5% spent lubricating oil, each for two years. Soil water retention showed steady increases with time in plots treated with legume plants and  poultry manure, over the 5% oil contamination (A5) and control. From 12 to 24 months, the use of poultry manure alone or in combination with the legume plants showed high water retention capacity at -3, -6 and -10 kPa. Gliricidia sapium  and Leucaena leucocophala combined with 0.5% poultry manure gave the highest improvement (0.33 and 0.31cm3cm3), respectively, in soil water  retention capacity at -6 kPa. Sodium adsorption ratio, exchangeable Sodium Percentage, electrical conductivity, salt concentration and osmotic pressure values were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the A5 at 12, 18, and 24 months. These values reached elevated levels in A5 such that, growth and yields of salt sensitive crop will be restricted. The use of Gliricidia, Leucaena and Calapogonium alone in combination with poultry manure significantly (P < 0.05) reduced salinity parameters to negligible levels within 12 and 24 months after spent oil contamination. These legume plants are promising species and are recommended for follow-up investigation, as they may offer a viable choice for remediation of oil contaminate soils.

 

Key words: Water retention, Salinity hazard, Legumes, Bioremediation, Organic waste.

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Date:22/05/2018
 
     
 
 
 
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